Category Archives: Francophone Africa

Others Are Investing in African Banks – Are You? (First in a Series)

Bank of Africa   Several financial institutions, including the Dutch bank, Rabobank, have created Arise, to participate in deals in banks in Africa, including the Bank of Africa, a pan-African banking conglomerate.

“Arise sera opérationnel à partir du 1er janvier 2017.

Rabobank apportera ainsi ses parts dans Zambia National Commercial Bank (Zanaco, 66 agences, environ 1 million de clients et 330,7 millions de dollars de crédits), le tanzanien National Microfinance Bank (175 agences, plus de 2 millions de clients et un total de 1,1 milliard de dollars de crédits), le rwandaisBanque populaire du Rwanda (BPR – 192 agences, 626 000 clients et 159,6 millions de de dollars de crédits), le mozambicain Banco Terra BTM (9 agences, environ 28 000 clients et 47,4 millions de dollars de crédits) et l’ougandais DFCU Bank (45 agences, 256 000 clients et 247,5 millions de dollars de crédits).”

Translation:

“Arise will be operational from 1 January 2017.

As a result, Rabobank will bring its stake in Zambia National Commercial Bank (Zanaco, 66 branches, approximately 1 million customers and 330.7 million dollars in credits), the Tanzanian National Microfinance Bank (175 branches, more than 2 million customers and a total 1.1 billion in credits), the Rwandan Banque Populaire du Rwanda (BPR – 192 branches, 626,000 customers and 159.6 million dollars of credits), Mozambique’s Banco Terra BTM (9 agencies, 28 000 customers and 47.4 million of loans) and the Ugandan DFCU Bank (45 branches, 256,000 customers and $ 247.5 million of credits).”

These “investor groups” are investing in the long-term growth in Africa through its financial institutions that believe in its future.  In this series, we will discuss and look at banks you might want to invest in.

“Plusieurs prêteurs européens créent un holding d’investissement dans les banques subsahariennes” (“Several european lenders create a holding company to invest in sub-Saharan banks”):  http://www.jeuneafrique.com/346815/economie/plusieurs-preteurs-europeens-creent-holding-dinvestissement-banques-subsahariennes/

Orange Desires to Grow in Africa, and It’s Working

orange afrique

Orange (France Telecom) has announced that its sales in Africa and the Middle East has grown 3.3% for the first six months of this year.  It has also made four acquisitions, representing 12 million new customers. We recommended that you take a look at this company about two years ago, and it looks like it’s still worth consideration.

Sa plus belle performance durant les six premiers mois de l’année a été réalisée en Afrique et au Moyen-Orient, région dans laquelle Orange compte une vingtaine d’implantations et où ses ventes ont augmenté de +3,3 % à 2,516 milliards d’euros au premier semestre. C’est d’ailleurs dans cette zone qu’Orange a été le plus actif.”

Translation:

“Its best performance in the first six months of the year was carried out in Africa and the Middle East region in which Orange has twenty installations and where its sales rose 3.3% to 2.516 billion from euros in the first half. This is also in this area in which Orange was the most active.”

They have divested themselves of Telecom Kenya, but are strengthening their businesses in French Africa and West and North Africa.

More growth still looks possible.

“Orange confirme sa croissance en Afrique et au Moyen-Orient au premiere semestre”: http://www.jeuneafrique.com/345099/economie/orange-maintient-croissance-afrique-moyen-orient-premier-semestre/

In addition to Anglophone, we’re scanning French and Portuguese business information to make sure we can let you know about the best opportunities in investing in African stocks.

Africa Investment Report owns shares in Orange.

Could You Be Missing Out on Investing in Francophone Africa?

FRENCH EQUATORIAL AFRICA - CIRCA 1946: a stamp printed in French Equatorial Africa shows Young Bacongo Woman, circa 1946

FRENCH EQUATORIAL AFRICA – CIRCA 1946: a stamp printed in French Equatorial Africa shows Young Bacongo Woman, circa 1946

Many investors in anglophone countries don’t seem to understand, or are afraid of, investing opportunities in francophone Africa.  Although this article from South Africa discusses it from their perspective and from a total business perspective (as opposed to a stock investor perspective), the theme here is relevant.

“Francophone Africa remains a bridge too far for most risk-averse South African investors. Only a handful of SA’s sizeable corporates have made the journey to countries in this complex but promising region, kept at bay by the invisible barriers of language and foreign business culture.”

We here at the African Investment Report remain “on the hunt” for great stocks in all of the countries of Africa, whether the culture is anglophone, french, lusophone or “whatever”.  The important thing is to find great investments that you can add to your portfolio.

Also see:

“Orange Could Be A Great Stock to Buy and a Great Play on African Growth”

“Standard Bank’s Expansion Into French Africa Teaches Us About Africa’s Investment Growth Potential”

“How to Invest in French Africa From Home”

Risk-averse Companies Missing Out in Francophone Africa: http://www.bdlive.co.za/opinion/columnists/2016/07/04/risk-averse-companies-missing-out-in-francophone-africa

France, Not China, is The Biggest Direct Investor in Africa

France_flag-lgMany people think that China, even though their economy is experiencing some rough spots, is the largest non-African investor in terms of direct investment. The truth is that France is the largest direct investor in Africa, as articles like this one have pointed out in the past.

What does this mean for the individual investor? It means that they could find more opportunities if they weren’t limited to learning only about anglophone (U.S., U.K. and Australian) companies that invest in Africa, for the most part.

Getting more information about French companies that invest in Africa could widen your scope and give you more opportunities.  That’s part of what we do at Africa Investment Report!

Orange Could Be A Great Stock to Buy and a Great Play on African Growth

orange Orange (ORAN), formerly France Telecom, was mentioned recently in Barron’s as possibly a good stock to purchase for the long term.  The company is on a cost-cutting crusade, and looks to significantly cut costs in the future.

“This may well be a stock worth looking into, both for its general growth prospects, and for its growth prospects in Africa.”

But what about the African growth prospects for Orange?  Orange is having very strong growth in the Middle East and Africa, and the telecommunications business is growing at a very healthy clip in these places.

Below is a map that denotes the countries where Orange has a strong presence. Notice on the map that Orange’s coverage is mostly in the francophone (French-speaking) countries. (Notice that they are not in South Africa, Nigeria nor Ghana, although they are in Kenya.)

Orange Operations in Africa: actual and proposed as of January 2013 Source: africantelecomsnews.com

Orange Operations in Africa: actual and proposed as of January 2013 – Source: africantelecomsnews.com

This may well be a stock worth looking into, both for its general growth prospects, and for its growth prospects in Africa.

Africa Investment Report covers not only the anglophone countries in Africa, but also the francophone and lusophone ones as well.  

Find out where we’re going with these Africa investment ideas and concepts by signing up for our free newsletter! Sign up in the box to the right, and as a gift for doing so, get our FREE report: “How to Profit From Africa’s Growth Without Leaving Home”.

 

 

 

 

Standard Bank’s Expansion Into French Africa Teaches Us About Africa’s Investment Growth Potential

标准银行总部 Standard Bank (SGBLY), a banking corporation based in South Africa, has discovered from its experience in the Ivory Coast, that there is plenty of growth potential in the francophone (French-speaking, culture, etc.) countries of Africa. In fact, this was termed to be “a strategic drive”.

This is one example of the fact that when we look at Africa’s investment potential, we cannot just consider the anglophone (English-speaking, culture, etc.) countries there.  There are the francophone and lusophone (Portuguese-speaking, culture, etc.), as well as the Arab countries, in Africa that merit consideration when it comes to investment, since many of them are growing, and businesses like Standard Bank are beginning to recognize that there are opportunities in different cultures.

Find out where we’re going with these Africa investment ideas and concepts by signing up for our free newsletter! Sign up in the box to the right, and as a gift for doing so, get our FREE report: “How to Profit From Africa’s Growth Without Leaving Home”. 

 

How to Invest in French Africa From Home

francophone africa map   French Africa, or francophone Africa, can be viewed as a “different animal”, in that that there is, of course, a different language and also, some would argue, a different cultural orientation than the so-called anglophone countries.  Francophone Africa is made up of 15 countries and at least 115 million people.  That’s as of 2007, so it’s probably grown a lot since!

Some of the countries, such as Senegal, the Ivory Coast (Cote d’Ivoire), Cameroon and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are experiencing rapid economic growth.

We here at Africa Investment Report are researching investment opportunities for you by not only looking at the literature in English, but also in French!

Previously we have reported on Lafarge and Schneider Electric.  We are also looking at Orange (ORAN), formerly France Telecom, that is tapping into the explosive mobile growth in Africa.

Find out where we’re going with these Africa investment ideas and concepts by signing up for our free newsletter! Sign up in the box to the right, and as a gift for doing so, get our FREE report: “How to Profit From Africa’s Growth Without Leaving Home”. So what are you waiting for?  Do it right now!